Top 10 Most Working Countries


It is natural to feel at the end of a hard work day that the hours worked were longer compared to any individual on the planet. But, there are several societies around the world where long hours are not only a norm but are expected. These countries have a long history of hard working citizens, a history in which the expectation of long hours is built. Modern society is founded on those of hard work, with building the foundations on which the country’s economy can flourish. The countries that have been called the hardest working in the world demonstrate a national work ethic on which economies thrive. Featured in this selection are the 10 countries that work the most, based on the average number of hours worked per year by their workers. In Brazil, if we add the national holidays that fall on weekdays in the year 2015 (11) to the 30 days of holidays and weekends (Of course we can include there 5 days with the municipal holidays, holidays that occur in the Thursday and amend with Friday, shutdowns, etc.) we will have: (11 + 30 + 104 + 5) – 365 = 215 working days. Resulting in 1720 hours of work per year in Brazil. This comparison is based on the 8 hour daily charge. We know well that there are people who work a lot less. Check out the countries that work the most in the world:

10. SLOVAK REPUBLIC – 1786 HOURS PER YEAR

After a 50-year period under the Communist regime of the Soviet Union, the Slovakians continue to work hard and are motivated to build their economy after independence. Unemployment peaked at 19% in 1999 and the recession has recently increased unemployment once again to 13.9%, but those who are employed work long hours. Electrical engineering and automobile manufacturing form the core industry sectors, employing thousands of workers. In addition, Slovakia has capitalized on its central position in Europe to become a center of trade.

9. MEXICO – 1866 HOURS A YEAR

Despite having the fourteenth largest economy in the world , Mexico’s hard work is often discounted by those who resent immigration from its southern neighbor. But, Armando Chacon, director of the Mexican Institute for Competitiveness, says Mexicans need to work harder than those in more developed countries for their lower level of education.

8. TURKEY – 1877 HOURS A YEAR

Although Turkey has a higher minimum wage represented as a percentage of the country’s average salary, the average graduate salary can be just over $ 10 per hour in the country. But Istanbul, the country’s financial capital, has nearly 30 billionaires, proving that not everyone in Turkey works for peanuts. The country’s wealth is found mainly in the northwest and west, and unemployment remains a problem in the east.

7. ESTONIA – 1879 HOURS A YEAR

To cite the site, visit Estonia, “A typical Estonian citizen would like to portray himself as a great worker, reliable, intelligent, innovative and friendly.” In addition to hard work, the country values ​​the education of its citizens and its students are encouraged to start their careers during the degree. Estonians have maintained a reputation for stoic hard work, even following the rule and collapse of the Soviet Union.

6. POLAND – 1939 HOURS A YEAR

Strangely, the impressive work ethic of Poles has caused friction in the UK in recent years. Following its accession to the European Union in 2004, Poland was granted free movement access through labor policy within Europe, resulting in many Polish workers emigrating to, among other countries, the United Kingdom and Ireland. Although Polish workers have become synonymous with hard work in the United Kingdom, the Poles themselves claim the opposite, arguing that communism created a lazy nation following a history of limited aspirations under forced labor.

5. CZECH REPUBLIC – 1947 HOURS A YEAR

Although the Czech Republic may be one of the hardest working people on the planet, last year it has also characterized it as the second most negative country, perhaps showing that working long hours is not conducive to positive attitude.

4. HUNGARY – 1961 HOURS A YEAR

Hungarians may work long hours, but they remain underpaid and since times of credit crunch have been tightening for many workers. Because many do not work in the country, only 55% of the working age population worked and paid tax in 2012 , the burden to support unemployment falls on workers, particularly those who have mortgages to pay. But despite the difficulties, the character in the country remains strong, meaning work hard to succeed.

3. RUSSIA – 1976 HOURS A YEAR

At the time when Russia was a communist state, several initiatives, including the Stakhanovite movement in the 1930s, promoted hard work. Although the Soviet Union may no longer exist, its legacy of hard work permeates the country.

2. CHILE – 2068 HOURS PER YEAR

Working conditions in Chile are highly regulated, and individuals are able to work 45 hours a week legally, provided they have a rest period of 24 hours a week, and many do so, to take home the maximum number of pesos a week. each day.

1. SOUTH KOREA – 2193 HOURS A YEAR

Many Koreans work late working overtime. This is admitted by the government, but a 5-day system, initially 40 hours in 2004, was instituted in an attempt to shorten working hours for pressured late-night office workers. But after 10 years, this initiative had little effect either on the occupation of the workers or on their happiness. However, South Korea is the leading position in this selection of the 10 most working countries.

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